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The Dog Blog – Kimberly Sarah Photography

Hello All,

I’d like to introduce Kimberly Sarah Photography’s first blog. I had a love for photography since I was a child, my Dad was an avid photographer. When I was about 10 I saved enough money to buy my very own Polaroid, how exciting. I still have a bunch of those photos!

I later moved on to a Pentax K1000, (that is s film camera for those who may not know).

I could bore you with all the years of learning film, developing etc. But this is not why you are here. You are here hopefully to learn about Kimberly Sarah Photography, my love for photography and my passion for dogs. Most of my pictures when I was a child was of my dogs. My first dog was Baron, a full bread German Shepard. What a beautiful dog he was. He was brought in to my house the day after I was born, we were close, very close. I will never forget the way he listened so intently. His eyebrows dancing on his face as I spoke to him while we laid face to face.  In the years to come I would have 5 other dogs, Arrow, Bucko, Zach, Dexter and now Winston. Winston is my little clown. A Cardigan Welsh Corgi. It may sound weird to tell you how much I love this dog…

Having had great dogs in my life I realized that the photos I had created were priceless. I am so grateful to have them to reflect on.

If you have a furry love in your life I encourage you to have a professional photo created. You will never regret doing it, only if you don’t. Now I don’t say this to make money or guilt you into a session with Kimberly Sarah Photography, but to help you in those days that you are missing your pup.

Kimberly Sarah Photography24

www.KimberlySarahPhotography.com

 

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Where would you like to Bring Fido?

Have you been looking for something different to do with your pupper?

I remember when BringFido was just starting out, not a lot of local information, but now!

You can find hotels, restaurants, activities, events, services and even Dog Photographers!

They have information about traveling with your animals, check out their TOP 10 Tips for Flying with Fido.

Most businesses are rated, and people can leave a comment. It’s a nice way to see what the locals have to say especially if you plan to travel. You can search by your home town or the town you will be visiting.

I use Bring Fido to see what dog activities are going on in the New Hampshire area.

If you haven’t checked out Bring Fido lately, go a head and give it a go!

 

Leave your Bring Fido experiences in the comments below!

 

 

 

Dogs in Art

On my recent trip to the MFA in Boston, MA I again noticed the central aspect of dogs. Such as on ladies laps, a sign of love and affection, hunting dogs, loyal dogs by their masters and dog as the focal point such as the master piece by Gerrit Dou “Dog at Rest” 1650.

Gerrit Dou dog

The dog has appeared in paintings as far back as 4500 BC when canines appeared on cave walls. As the dog’s relationship with the human evolved, so did the way he is represented in art. In the 18th century, dog portraits became popular amongst the wealthy British.

Spanish painter, Diego Velasquez (1599-1660) painted the dog in the company of children. In this image “Maids of Honor”, we see a large dog in the foreground tolerating an ornery child.

velazquez.meninas

In 1866 artist Edouard Manet created “A King Charles Spaniel”

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Another famous artist Pablo Picasso created a pastel and gouache on cardboard called “Boy With Dog” 1905

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And one of my childhood favorites is Norman Rockwell (1894-1978). He frequently used puppies ans dogs in his paintings, some as the main subject, and some as the sidekick, or partner in crime as in “No Swimming”

rockwell_swimming

What era would you dog fit into? Do you have your dog in a piece of Art?

Saying Goodbye

Accepting the death of a pet is never easy. Here are suggestions for working through this difficult time as a pet owner.

Accepting the death of a pet is never easy. Here are suggestions for working through this difficult time as a pet owner.

by Martha Stewart

Many people have trouble admitting that they’re grieving a pet. They’re often embarrassed or ashamed, especially when outsiders comment that it’s only a pet or that they can get another dog or cat. “There’s a stigma in society about losing a companion animal. It’s more accepted to mourn the loss of a person than a pet,” says Diane Pomerance, author and grief-recovery specialist. She asks people to remind themselves that they are in fact “mourning the loss of a family member.”

Getting through this difficult period starts by giving yourself permission to grieve. “Designate time every day to do this,” says Claire Chew Gillenson, a life-transition coach and petloss educator. Keep a journal. Talk to a counselor or friend who understands your loss.

If you had to put your animal to sleep, try not to fixate on your pet’s last moments. “If guilt surfaces, forgive yourself and remember that you did everything you could,” Gillenson says. Try to remember the good times: long games of fetch or evenings cozied up on the sofa.

If you have kids, especially if this is their first experience with death, talk openly with them. “Children are generally curious and want to know what’s happening,” says Mac Hafen, a clinical marriage and family therapist at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State, adding that it’s best to use terms such as death and dying rather than going to sleep, which could make children scared of going to bed at night. If they’re not asking questions, find out how they’re feeling. Try engaging them in play or artwork.

Taking time to honor your pet will also bring comfort and peace to you and your family. After Katie died, I sent a note to friends and family announcing her death and sharing stories from her therapy work. One of the hospitals where we volunteered held a memorial service for her, and I spent weeks creating a scrapbook of Katie’s life. All of these activities helped me say goodbye, but there are many ways — such as planting a tree, donating money, or holding a remembrance party — to memorialize your pet. The key is doing what feels right for you.

Images of your pet around your house allows for the grieving process to feel natural, you will feel less separation and can always look into your dogs eyes.

a-piece-of-my-heart

Easter Egg Hunts, For Dogs?

Yes! It’s a thing! Your dog can join in the Easter egg hunt! In fact, dog-friendly egg hunts are growing in popularity around the country.
Your dog can eat the boiled eggs, too. Real eggs are good for a dog’s health—including the shell, as it turns out. Cooking them reduces the risk of salmonella, though some dog owners swear by raw eggs for their dogs. Check with your vet if in doubt.

Alternatively, you can stuff plastic eggs with stinky, yummy dog treats, which provide a great opportunity for teaching scent work. (Just make sure you don’t let them crack the plastic with their jaws; instead, open the eggs for them. See more on safety considerations below.)

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Easter Egg Safety for Dogs

  • Supervise your dog carefully, as plastic eggs can crack and be dangerous if swallowed.
  • Keep your dog on leash while hunting, so you can make sure they don’t eat anything they shouldn’t—or get a little too excited when competing with a human child for treats.
  • Plastic eggs filled with dog treats should be large enough that they can’t be swallowed whole.
  • Don’t let your dog eat chocolate, of course. And while you’re at it, watch out for the little foil wrappers that might get dropped in the candy-eating frenzy.
  • Any eggshells for consumption should be dyed with non-toxic colors.

If this all seems like a bit more work than you’re up for, never fear. Give your pooch an Easter-themed dog toy, and she’ll feel included.

 

Will your dog have an Easter Egg Hunt this year? If so, Send me pictures!

10 Signs You Have a Dog Crush

Everyone one knows how much their dog loves them. It’s easy to see in their wag, smile and loving eyes.

So if your looking for the very best Valentine’s day, why not show your dog how much you love them and take them out for a beautiful walk and treat them to a lovey meal! It could be the best Valentine’s day ever!

You Might Have a Dog Crush if:

  1. You Gush: You gush about how your dog is cute, smart, cheeky and does all these things to make you smile. Congratulations, you have a dog crush!
  2. Photos: Your mobile, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter are full of photos of your dog.
  3. You Get Excited: Just as much as your dog does when you greet each other at the door
  4. When you are away from your dog: You find yourself thinking about what your dog might be doing right now, and got a monitor and app to see how they are doing…you have a dog crush.
  5. Shopping!: When you find yourself shopping for clothes and thinking, “I wonder if I should pick up something nice for my pup,” you have a dog crush
  6. Favorite Night In: Great movie, sofa and a dog snuggled up next to you is the best night of the week.
  7. Bedtime:  You subconsciously move to the edge of the bed so that dog has enough room.
  8. Vacation Time: You start checking local trails, dog friendly beaches and hotels before booking your holiday.
  9. Gazing: You catch your self gazing at your dog while it snoozes in a cute and adorable position. ummm…..dog crush!
  10. Kisses!  :There is nothing better in your day that a snuggle and a kiss with your dog. It actually makes your day all that more rewarding.

 

I Like Big Mutts and I Cannot Lie!

Great Dane. Mastiff. Newfoundland, Dogue de Bordeaux. Great Pyrenees. Bernese Mountain Dog. Tibetan Mastiff. Leonberger. St. Bernard and the list can go on.

Most large dog breeds were bred for a purpose or function. Some breeds were meant to be hunters, others guard dogs. Dogs with great endurance brought livestock or produce to market or protected the farmer’s animals. So which ones make good pets?

Great Danes: One might argue that this huge and majestic creature more closely resembles a small horse than a dog. Either way, the beautiful Great Dane is sure to stand out in a crowd. But it is more than appearance that makes this breed stand out. The personality of the Great Dane is unforgettable. These dogs are gentle, playful, friendly and incredibly loyal. The Great Dane is a native of Germany that was developed as a boar hunter and, later, a watchdog. Great Danes weigh anywhere from 100-200 pounds and about 28-30 (or more) inches tall.

 

Mastiff: Considered the largest of all dog breeds, the English Mastiff’s name seems to fit its best descriptions: massive. This giant dog breed is all brawn and power on the outside, but deep down it is a lovable, mushy companion–and often a bit of a couch potato! These dogs can top the scales at 220 pounds and be 30 or more inches tall. However, it looks like a large percentage of the weight is in their huge heads. Some considerations if you are thinking about getting a Mastiff: You’ll likely need to carry around a “drool-rag” and duck when a head shake comes on. You’ll need to protect people and objects from that massive tail (and protect the tail itself from damage).

 

Leonberger: The Leonberger is a beautiful, massive working dog with a kind and gentle disposition. Though it is not an extremely common breed, the Leo has its own following, and for good reason. This breed is known to bond closely with its family and seems to have a kind of intuition when it comes to human emotions. Because of this, they make excellent family members and also superb therapy dogs. They are gigantic yet gentle with incredibly soft coats. If you love giant dogs with even bigger hearts, have the room for a 120- to 170-pound dog, and can exercise him daily, then you might have found your match. The Leonberger originates from Leonberg, Germany.

 

Bullmastiff: The Bullmastiff is a powerhouse that was originally developed for protection. English gamekeepers in the mid-19th century crossed the Mastiff and the Bulldog. The result was a powerful, fearless dog that could stop poachers in their tracks. Today’s Bullmastiff is still a highly capable guard dog, but the breed is most treasured as a companion. Despite a powerful and somewhat intimidating appearance, this is a gentle and affectionate dog that forms a solid bond with its family members. However, the Bullmastiff’s tough side does instinctively comes out when necessary. Like its cousin, the Mastiff, be prepared for slobber. Weighing from 100-130 pounds and 24 to 27 inches tall, there’s plenty to love about these big sweeties.

 

Do you have a favorite Giant Breed?

See how many large breed dogs you can find on my website! Go!

*Photo of the Wright Brothers St. Bernard

4 Ways to Keep Your Pet Safe from the Christmas Tree

0M0A3267Most homes this time of year have a fresh Christmas tree. Here are 4 dangers your tree may pose to your pets

  1. Tree water: Stagnant tree water breeds bacteria, which, if consumed, could make your pet sick. Tree water can also contain fertilizer or other contaminants harmful to your pet. Lastly, any additives you put in tree water can make your pet sick if consumed.
  2. Tree needles: Tree needles and branches can cause blockages that often need surgical intervention if consumed.
  3. Tree flocking: Who doesn’t love a white Christmas? Flocking is pretty, but it’s mildly toxic to pets if consumed.
  4. Falling trees: Cat and dog owners should anchor their real or faux tree to the ceiling to prevent their pets from knocking it over. The falling tree can hurt your pet, but spilled water and other debris can make for a tempting snack before you’re able to tidy the wreckage. Never mind that broken ornaments and accessible wiring pose their own problems.

Also remember, the sweet and the savory of the holidays are not always for pets! Cookies and candies, all things chocolate, dough, and table scraps from holiday meals many times contain artificial flavorings or sweeteners or are simply foods that can make your pet very sick. Keep your pets happy this season, feed them their regular healthy foods.

 

Merry Christmas!

Kim and Bud